The evolution of the EHR

The transition from paper charts to electronic health records hasn’t been easy, but there’s no denying the power and potential of the EHR. Andrew S. Kanter, MD, and Steven Rube, MD, reflect on the early days of the technology and what the future holds for patients and providers.
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Developing new technologies is an iterative process; a relentless mix of brainstormed ideas, creative problem solving, and endless lines of code. The creation of electronic health records is no exception. Since their initial development in the 1960s, EHRs have evolved in myriad ways. No longer just data repositories, EHRs have transformed into multifaceted tools used for everything from organizing individual medical problem lists, to billing, to informing population health initiatives.

In the white paper, The evolution of the electronic health record: Toward better optimization for clinical use, we explore the ways in which EHRs have changed over the years, how they’re improving the patient-provider relationship, and the potential that lies in the EHR of the future.

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