Technology as a partner: Re-engaging clinicians for success

Leveraging health information technology (HIT) to improve the physician experience is key to achieving the Quadruple Aim. IMO’s Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Andrew Kanter, discusses this important objective in his latest white paper.
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clinician-engagement-whitepaper

After more than two decades of using electronic health records, a lot has been learned about how to leverage these tools to improve patient care. Compared to the days of paper charts, EHRs help providers to document patient problems with greater detail and nuance, while also allowing them to communicate with each other in a more efficient way. Indeed, the EHR even helps clinicians more effectively talk to themselves over time, by allowing easier access to prior patient encounters.

With all of this accumulated knowledge, we also know that providers sometimes struggle with growing documentation requirements. One of the next great challenges we face as an industry is addressing this issue – figuring out how to re-engage clinicians with EHRs so technology acts as a partner in providing patient care.

IMO’s Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Andrew Kanter, has spent much of his career working on ways to improve the provider experience with electronic documentation. In his most recent whitepaper, Technology as a partner: Re-engaging clinicians for success, he explores the origins of the issue and discusses key solutions to help set up clinicians for success.

Dr. Andrew Kanter joined IMO in 1995 and now serves as the Chief Medical Officer. Andrew is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Biomedical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology at Columbia University and has served as the former Director of Health Information Systems/Medical Informatics for the Millennium Villages Project at the Earth Institute. He received both his MD and MPH from Harvard University in 1991 and completed a medical residency and chief residency in Internal Medicine at the University of Washington in Seattle from 1991–1995.

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