Why I brought an all-female team to the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference

In an industry where women are noticeably underrepresented in leadership, IMO stands out from the crowd. CEO Ann Barnes writes about the "girl gang" she brought to the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference last week and how supporting women in leadership can create positive change.
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It’s been two years since the infamous “more Michaels than women” agenda debacle at JP Morgan’s annual Healthcare Conference. While there has been some effort to do better by way of on-stage representation at the conference, the speaker schedules still clearly remain unbalanced. But the lists of speakers at this conference is only part of the problem. It highlights a much more important fact that overall, the healthcare industry continues to lag in female leadership.

About 80% of the healthcare workforce is made up of women, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. But fewer than 20% hold key leadership roles. Only 19% of hospitals and 4%  of healthcare companies are led by women, Korn Ferry found in a related paper. This is a huge crisis of leadership for our industry. Not because men aren’t up to the task, but because women bring unique characteristics and skill sets to the job. A lack of women in these key leadership roles means that we as an industry don’t get to benefit from the insights that stem from these skills.  

As the CEO of a growing healthcare software company, I am committed to hiring, promoting, and mentoring women in my company. I am proud that our Chief Growth Officer, Chief Operating Officer, and Chief Financial Officer are all women, and that they were the team that accompanied me to the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference this year. They hold critical roles at IMO, and they were the individuals who were best positioned to lead important meetings with industry leaders who need to know more about the essential role our technology is playing to reduce administrative burdens and help clinicians deliver better care. A few attendees even commented on our “girl gang” and how unique it was to meet with an all-female team.

I challenge myself and my peers at other organizations in the healthcare industry to make 2020 a year of greater leadership diversity. While it may be a while before there are more women than men on stage at large-scale healthcare conferences, I do believe that women in leadership roles committed to hiring and mentoring women will create a force for change.

Ann Barnes joined IMO in 2018 as Chief Executive Officer, leading the company’s day-to-day operations. In November 2008, she joined MedData as Vice President of Client Services and rose quickly to the position of Chief Operating Officer. In February 2013, Ann was promoted to President, then to CEO soon after. She also served on their Board of Directors. Ann is a graduate of the University of the Pacific in San Francisco where she earned a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration and Marketing.

About Intelligent Medical Objects (IMO)

At IMO, we are dedicated to powering care as you intended, through a platform that is intelligent, intuitive, and intentional. Used by more than 4,500 hospitals and 500,000 physicians daily, IMO’s clinical interface terminology (CIT) forms the foundation for healthcare enterprise needs including effective management of EHR problem lists, accurate documentation, and the mapping of over 2.4 million clinician-friendly terms across 24 different code systems.

We offer a portfolio of products that includes terminologies and value sets that are clinically vetted, always current, and maintenance-free. This aligns to provider organizations’ missions, EHR platforms’ inherent power, and the evolving vision of the healthcare industry while ensuring accurate care documentation and administrative codes. So clinicians can get back to being clinicians, health systems can get reimbursed, and patients can more easily engage in their own care. As intended.

© 2020 Intelligent Medical Objects, Inc. All rights reserved

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