Interoperability and data overload: Preparing for greater EHR integration

Earlier this year, the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) finalized new rules for the 21st Century Cures Act that require health systems to increase their interoperability efforts and facilitate greater EHR integration. Smart strategies for the collection and organization of this data will be critical for success – without them, providers may be overwhelmed, not helped, by the sheer volume of new data.
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In the white paper Interoperability, information blocking, and the coming data tsunami, Andrew S. Kanter, MD, Chief Medical Officer at IMO, explains the specifics of the new Final Rules on interoperability and data sharing from the HHS and what they mean for health systems and providers.

While there are numerous upsides to increasing the integration of important patient data in the EHR and making it more accessible, overloading electronic health records with too much data can easily have the adverse effect of overwhelming providers. This paper explores ways to mitigate this negative outcome by re-envisioning how patient data is organized and presented to the clinician.

Learn more by downloading the white paper here:

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