Coding for gold: Tokyo 2020 and ICD-10-CM codes

While the pandemic continues, the 2020 Tokyo Olympics have provided a welcome spectacle to many worldwide – allowing us to embrace our global community, celebrate new world records, and of course, champion some ICD-10-CM codes.
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medical coding

S92.406A: Nondisplaced fracture of unspecified fracture of unspecified great toe

Unless you’re Raven Saunders, aka The Hulk, doing several spins leading up to your shot put toss puts you at risk of this injury. Luckily, Raven has this event covered, so you won’t have to sub in and risk fracturing your toe if you miss the mark.

S43.306A: Dislocation of unspecified parts of unspecified shoulder girdle

When Gianmarco Tamberi of Italy and Muta Essa Barshim of Qatar chose to share the gold medal for the high jump, their celebratory jumps and hugs were almost as legendary as their tie. Luckily, they didn’t go too over the top and injure their shoulders with all the enthusiasm.

T25.029A: Burn of unspecified degree of unspecified foot, initial encounter

You know what they say: if you can’t stand the hot sand, get off the beach volleyball court. Or, at least that’s what they could have said when the sand was so hot during the Tokyo Olympics that the sand had to be hosed down for players to stand on it safely.

L55.9: Sunburn, unspecified

With the 2020 Olympic Games taking place during a heatwave, we hope all athletes remembered to pack sunscreen – competing with a sunburn sounds less than ideal.

R41.0: Disorientation, unspecified

This year, many non-gymnasts worldwide learned about the terrifying phenomenon known as the twisties – when a gymnast has a mind-body disconnect that disrupts their spatial awareness – endangering their performance and, most importantly, their safety.

E86.0: Dehydration 

Relevant to all athletes and humans in general, dehydration is no joke. And, if you can’t compete like an Olympian, at least you can hydrate like one.

Y92.x: Sports and athletics area as the place of occurrence of the external cause

While noting what injury someone has is key, the location of the injury is equally important. We’ll let you decide what counts as “athletic”, though.

Are you prepared for the latest ICD-10-CM code updates? Register for our on-demand webinar to get ahead of the game when it comes to 2022’s changes to the code manual.
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